Publications, presentations

Publications

Heyne, M., Wang, X., Derrick, D., Dorreen, K., & Watson, K. (accepted). The articulation of /ɹ/ in New Zealand English. Journal of the International Phonetic Association.

Heyne, M., Gick, B., & Derrick, D. (2017) Transfer of skilled behavior across different vocal tract activities: The influence of speech production on brass instrument performance. Stem-, Spraak- en Taalpathologie 22(Supplement): 8.

Heyne, M. (2016). The influence of First Language on playing brass instruments: An ultrasound study of Tongan and New Zealand trombonists (Unpublished doctoral dissertation), University of Canterbury, Christchurch, New Zealand. [Download a German translation of selected passages]

Heyne, M., & Derrick, D. (2016). Visualization techniques for empirical brass instrument research. Journal of the International Trumpet Guild 40(4): 6-14, 24.

Heyne, M. (2016). Articulatory phonetics & the influence of native language on trombone playing. Presentation at the New Zealand Linguistics Olympiad Finals, Auckland, New Zealand, April 2016.

Heyne, M., & Derrick, D. (2015). Using a radial ultrasound probe’s virtual origin to compute midsagittal smoothing splines in polar coordinates. Journal of the Acoustical Society of America 138(6): EL509-514. http://dx.doi.org/10.1121/1.4937168
Copyright (2015) Acoustical Society of America. This article may be downloaded for personal use only. Any other use requires prior permission of the author and the Acoustical Society of America. The article may also be found here.

Heyne, M., & Derrick, D. (2015). The influence of tongue position on trombone sound: A likely area of language influence, in: Proceedings of the 18th International Congress of Phonetic Sciences (ICPhS), ed. by The Scottish Consortium for ICPhS 2015. Glasgow, Scotland.

Heyne, M. & Derrick, D. (2015). Trombone players seem to use different tongue positions while playing sustained notes, depending on their native languages,” in: Proceedings of the 9th Triennial Conference of the European Society for the Cognitive Sciences of Music (ESCOM), ed. by Ginsborg, J., Lamont, A., and Bramley, S. Manchester, England. 446-455.

Heyne, M. & Derrick, D. (2014). Some initial finding regarding first language influence on playing brass instruments, in: Proceedings of the 15th Australasian International Conference on Speech Science and Technology, ed. by Hay, J. & Parnell, E. Christchurch, New Zealand, Australasian Speech Science and Technology Association (ASSTA). 180-183.

 

Presentations (incl. posters)

Heyne, M. (2018). The influence of native language on brass playing: Motor memory from speech production affects midsagittal tongue shape during trombone performance. Invited talk presented at the Boston Speech Motor Control Working Group Meeting, Boston, MA, January 2018.

Heyne, M. (2017). The influence of native language on brass playing: Articulatory evidence for the transfer of skilled behavior across different vocal tract activities. Invited talk presented at the University of Melbourne Languages and Linguistics Seminar Series, Melbourne, Australia, September 2017.

Heyne, M. & Derrick. D. (2017). An empirical study of native language influence on trombone performance. Talk presented at the International Symposium on Performance Science, Reykjavík, Iceland, August 30 – September 2, 2017.

Heyne, M., Gick, B., & Derrick, D. (2017). Transfer of skilled behavior across different vocal tract activities: The influence of speech production on brass instrument performance. Talk presented at the 7th International Conference on Speech Motor Control, Groningen, the Netherlands, July 5 – 8, 2017.

Heyne, M. (2017). The influence of native language on brass playing: An ultrasound study of Tongan and Kiwi trombone players. Talk presented at the NZILBB Seminar Series, University of Canterbury, New Zealand, April 2017.

Heyne, M., Wang, X., Dorreen, K., Derrick, D., & Watson, K. (2016). The articulation of /ɹ/ in New Zealand English. Poster presented at the 5th Joint meeting of the Acoustical Society of America and the Acoustical Society of Japan, Honolulu, Hawai’i, November-December 2016.

Heyne, M., Dorreen, K., Wang, X., Derrick, D., & Watson, K. (2016). An ultrasound study of /ɹ/ in New Zealand English. Talk presented at the Linguistic Society of New Zealand Annual Conference, Massey University, Wellington, New Zealand, November 2016.

Heyne, M. (2016). The influence of native language on brass playing: An ultrasound study of Tongan and Kiwi trombone players. Invited talk presented at the University of British Columbia Department of Linguistics Colloquium Series, Vancouver, Canada, November 2016.

Heyne, M., Derrick, D. (2016). Stylistic variation of sub-phonemic syllabic influences on New Zealand English schwa production. Talk presented at New Ways of Analyzing Variation (NWAV) 45, Simon Fraser University, Vancouver, Canada, November 2016.

Heyne, M., Derrick, D. (2016). An articulatory and acoustic study of monophthongs in New Zealand English. Talk presented at the New Zealand English and English in New Zealand Conference (NZEENZ), University of Canterbury, Christchurch, New Zealand, June 2016.

Heyne, M., Derrick, D., & Hay, J. (2015). An ultrasound study of monophthongs in New Zealand English. Talk given at the 46th Annual Conference of the Australian Linguistic Society, Western Sydney University, Parramatta, Australia, December 2015.

Heyne, M. (2015). The ‘singing approach’ to brass playing revisited: We sing the language we speak. Talk given at the 2nd Conference of the Australian Music & Psychology Society, Western Sydney University, Parramatta, Australia, December 2015.

Heyne, M. (2015). An ultrasound study of monophthongs in New Zealand English. Canterbury Postgraduate Showcase ’15, University of Canterbury, Christchurch, New Zealand, November 2015. (Prize for best overall presentation)

Heyne, M., & Derrick, D. (2015). First Language influence on playing brass instruments. Invited talk given at the MARCS Monday Meeting, MARCS Institute for Brain, Behaviour and Development, Western Sydney University, Australia, September 2015.

Heyne, M., & Derrick, D. (2015). Why expert listeners might be able to distinguish differences in sound produced by brass players from different language backgrounds. Poster presented at the 10th UK Language Variation and Change Conference (UKLVC). York, England, September 2015.

Heyne, M., & Derrick, D. (2015). Trombone players seem to use different tongue positions while playing sustained notes, depending on their native languages. Poster presented at the 9th Triennial Conference of the European Society for the Cognitive Sciences of Music (ESCOM). Manchester, England, August 2015.

Heyne, M., & Derrick, D. (2015). Visualization techniques for empirical brass instrument research. Invited talk given at the ESCOM 2015 pre-conference workshop on Music & Wellbeing, Royal Northern College of Music, Manchester, England, August 2015.

Heyne, M., & Derrick, D. (2015). The influence of tongue position on trombone sound: A likely area of language influence. Poster presented at the 18th International Congress of Phonetic Sciences. Glasgow, Scotland, August 2015.

Heyne, M., & Derrick, D. (2015). The influence of native language on brass playing AND Visualization techniques for empirical brass research. Invited talk given at the Melbourne Conservatorium of Music, University of Melbourne, Australia, August 2015.

Heyne, M., & Derrick, D. (2015). Brass players with different native languages seem to use different tongue positions during playing. Talk given at 40th Annual Conference of the International Trumpet Guild, Columbus, OH, May 2015.

Heyne, M. & Derrick, D. (2015). Benefits of using polar coordinates for working with ultrasound midsagittal tongue contours. Poster presented at the 169th meeting of the Acoustical Society of America (ASA), Pittsburgh, PA, May 2015.

Heyne, M. & Derrick, D. (2014). Some initial findings regarding first language influence on playing brass instruments. Talk given at the 15th Australasian International Conference on Speech Science and Technology (SST), Christchurch, New Zealand, December 2014.

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